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TIPPY TAPS

Accesible Handwashing to the Most Unaccesible Reaches of Guatemala

 

SO... WHAT IS A TIPPY TAP?

A whimsical name for a vital device-Tippy taps were first developed by Doctor James Watt in Zimbabwe, 1985, to provide hands-free hand washing, particularly in rural areas which lack running water. 

WHY TIPPY TAPS?

SAVE LIVES: When tippy taps with soap and proper hand washing eduction are provided, the rate of infectious disease in a community can be reduced up to 47%.  

SAVE WATER:  Only 40ml of water are required to effectively wash with a tippy tap, as compared to the cup and bowl method which uses approximately 500-800 ml.  In regions experiencing reduced water supply every milliliter counts. Waste water is recycled for flushing toilets or irrigation.

PROJECTS

TIPPY TAPS AT HOME

Tippy Tap hand-wash stations and hand-wash education are provided to homes, and with continuing education involving all community stakeholders, the project is designed to create behavioral change. The presence of a Tippy Tap is a reminder to wash after dedicating, before preparing or eating food. Data are conclusive that this protocol reduces common diseases 42-48%.

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TIPPY TAPS AT SCHOOL

In Guatemala more than 10,000 schools lack full time water and adequate fixtures. The Tippy Tap School hand-wash stations are especially designed to capture water when it becomes available,  ready for children when they arrive at school. The device holds  adequate water for 100 students to wash four times, four days. Gray water is used to flush toilets. 


Recent adaptation of the School Tippy Tap, called WASH in a Barrel, provides for a transportable model to be shipped to remote areas. When the Tippy Tap arrives, local authorities and teachers install the fixture, and open the barrel to reveal complete hand-wash curriculum with learning materials and posters. 

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TIPPY TAPS FOR HEALTH CLINICS

Can you imagine a nurse not being able to wash their hands?  With only intermittent water supply, the healthcare clinics in the mountain villages near San Andres Itzapa lack fixtures and full time water supply.  The mid-size tippy tap station was developed at the request of the traveling circuit nurses. Like its big brother the school Tippy Tap, and the home tippy tap, the fixture provides vital barrier to disease transmission.

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